Archive for April 5th, 2018

Apr
05

2018/04/05

Posted by: | Comments (0)

DeafDigest Sports – April 5, 2018

barry@deafdigest.com; barry.strassler@gmail.com
for options, look at tabs at deafnews

Hot DeafSports News at:
http://deafdigestsports.com/

— Maryland track

— Gallaudet baseball

— deaf collegiate hockey player

— deaf professional auto racer

– deaf major leaguers, 125 years ago

Deaf Sports Collections update
— long forgotten Gallaudet baseball game
http://deafdigestsports.com/deaf-sports-collections/

DeafSports picture of the day
http://deafdigest.com/1926-picture-deaf-basketball-team/

………………………………………..

Gallaudet baseball

Bison doubled up by No. 24 Catholic, 18-9

WASHINGTON – Gallaudet University made the short trip over to The Catholic
University of America to face the No. 24 Cardinals in a non-conference
game here Wednesday.

The Bison (3-17-1) fell behind early 7-0 and later trailed 16-5 before
falling 18-9 as the game was called for darkness in the bottom of the
eighth inning.

GU scored four runs in the fifth inning as senior first baseman Justin
Strong (Charlotte, N.C.) delivered a two-run double to center field.
Sophomore Winston Lane (Brooklyn Center, Minn.) and senior Dylan Hayes
(Endicott, N.Y.) both drove in runs to cut Catholic’s lead to 10-5 before
the Cardinals added six runs in the bottom half.

Gallaudet added two more runs in the sixth and seventh innings. Strong
brought home two runs in the sixth on a single. In the seventh, a Bison
runner scored from third base on a passed ball and junior Cameron Upton
(Vicksburg, Miss.) singled in senior Kyle Gumm (Dallas, Texas), who had
walked for the fourth time in the game.

Sophomore Frank Diaz (Far Rockaway, N.Y.) took the loss as the starter
lasted three innings where he allowed seven runs (five earned) on eight
hits, two walks and one strikeout.

BISON TRACKS

Strong went 3-for-5 with four RBI

Gumm scored three times

GU had two extra-base hits

Seven different Bison had a hit

UP NEXT
Gallaudet returns home to begin North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC)
play this weekend against Penn St.-Abington (8-7) and Penn St.-Berks
(5-7).

………………………………………

Maryland track

part of newspaper story

the Quinn Hoover Invitational

The Huskies’ boys team accumulated a score of 176 to capture first
place. Clear Spring followed in second with 128, followed by the Maryland
School for the Deaf (69), Hancock (63), and Faith Christian (30).

The Lady Huskies racked up 187 points for their win. The Maryland School
for the Deaf came in second with 133, followed by Clear Spring (93), Faith
Christian (72), and Hancock (4).

………………………………………

deaf collegiate hockey player

Garrett Gintoli

freshman

men’s hockey

Milwaukee School of Engineering

If the name Gintoli is familiar, yes, his older
deaf brother Peter played a season in minor
league hockey last year.

his profile is this:
High School: Played hockey, soccer, and lacrosse for Notre Dame Fairfield
High School … won bronze medals with Team USA at the Deaflympics.

this season:
he played all 27 of his team’s 27 games

he scored 5 goals

he assisted on 11 goals

and is pretty much a gentleman on the ice, only having spent
just eight minutes in the penalty box!

…………………………………………..

deaf professional auto racer

Kris Martin

Burlington, Ontario

auto racer

no real updates on him on any of these web sites or on the
social media

………………………………………….

late 19th century/early 20th century deaf players in
major league baseball

based on a web posting

for some reason there were quite a few deaf major league
players during late 19th century/early 20th century
as compared to the past 75 years.

In fact, the 1901 New York Giants (now San Francisco)
team had three deaf pitchers. The best one was
Dummy Taylor; the two other deaf pitchers quickly
flamed out.

Why so many in these early years?

Possibly because many deaf schools had baseball
teams; it was these schools’ primary sport as
football and basketball was not yet popular until
later in the 20th century. The popularity of baseball
gave the better deaf players more opportunities
for development of their playing skills.

And another matter – age. Many deaf school graduates
were already adults (age 21) and they were able to
play this sport for more than just four seasons.
 

Categories : DeafDigest Sports
Comments (0)

This is a Widget Section

This section is widgetized. If you would like to add content to this section, you may do so by using the Widgets panel from within your WordPress Admin Dashboard. This Widget Section is called "Feature bottom"