Archive for June 28th, 2018

Jun
28

2018/06/28

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DeafDigest Sports – June 28, 2018

barry@deafdigest.com
for options, click on the above deafnews tab

Hot DeafSports News at:
http://deafdigestsports.com/

— random deafsports thoughts

— football schedule complete

— deaf swimming story

— deaf women soccer in China

— deaf cricket story

— superintendent interpreting football game on TV

— Soccer ball manufacturer

— Hope Solo comment about Deaf Soccer

Deaf Sports Collections update
— deaf umpire mystery
http://deafdigestsports.com/deaf-sports-collections/

DeafSports picture of the day
http://deafdigest.com/1900-baseball-champions/

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2018 football schedule – completed

DeafDigest Sports editor now has schedules of all
deaf schools football teams.

The link is:
http://deafdigestsports.com/2018/06/11/

and scroll down until you see the schedule

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deaf swimming

Learning to swim after watching Michael Phelps on TV

part of newspaper story

Swimming: Good luck to Kieron as he represents GB in Deaf European Champs

AFTER watching the torch procession makes it way through Grays, and
following the 2012 Olympics on the TV, Kieron asked his mum if he could
try out at Thurrock swimming club.

On arrival at Blackshots pool Kieron was asked to swim all four strokes,
with no previous swim coaching his Mum explained to the Thurrcok Swimming
Club coach that he had never swum butterfly.

Not letting this deter him Kieron explained that he had been watching the
Olympics and he knew what to do as he had watched Michael Phelps!

This week see’s Kieron travel to Poland to take part in the Deaf
European Swimming championships for Great Britain.

For Kieron this is the culmination of years of training with many early
morning training sessions, competitions all over the UK and many GB deaf
swimming records to his name.

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Hearing Impaired Girls Form Football Team in S China

short newspaper story

Football has changed the life of many life hearing-impaired girls in
Zhanjiang, south China’s Guangdong Province, and helped them realize their
dreams, according to a recent newspaper profile.

In 2013, Zhanjiang formed a special women’s team to prepare for the 7th
Provincial Paralympic Games, consisting of students from a special
education school in the city, After two years of arduous training, the
team finally took gold at the event in 2015.

Since then, they have successively participated in a series of domestic
and foreign competitions.

In 2017, the Chinese national hearing-impaired football team was
established by the former Zhanjiang players and it went on to participate
in the 23rd Deaflympics in Turkey.

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Deaf cricket

part of newspaper story

Deaf cricketer Matthew sets sights on World Cup glory

Talented sportsman Matthew Bailey could soon be playing in the World Cup
– as a member of the England Deaf Cricket Team.

The 18-year-old, who has coped with severe hearing loss since he was
three, is making a name for himself as a fast bowler.

“I’ve been playing cricket since I was seven and joined the England
team two or three years ago. I’m quite unique as I’m the only
left-handed bowler.”

He is waiting to find out if he’s made the squad f the deaf
cricketers’ World Cup, which takes place in India later this year.

……………………………………………..

random deafsports thoughts

after reading this story:

Oregon State was down to its final out – its final strike, even –
the ninth inning of Game 2 of the College World Series, trailing 3-2 in
the game and having already dropped Game 1.

When Cadyn Grenier earlier sent a pop-up into foul territory on a 1-1
count, it appeared that Arkansas would be celebrating its first national
title just seconds later.

But neither the first baseman, second baseman nor right fielder for the
Razorbacks was able to make the play.

Grenier ripped a single to left off Matt Cronin three pitches later that
scored Zak Taylor and tied Game 2 of the College World Series 3-3

DeafDigest Sports editor had a flashback:

As a young man, he was a member of a deaf softball team that was playing
in a league game against a hearing team.

Two out; man on second base and third base in the final inning. Hearing
team was leading by one run. It was at the bottom of the inning. If third
out, game is over and the deaf team loses the game.

The batter, Jim Macfadden, normally a solid hitter, hit a short weak pop
fly that went between the leftfielder and the centerfielder. The pop fly
was catchable by either of them. Much to the disbelief of the deaf team,
the pop fly landed between both outfielders. The deaf team bench screamed
and told the runners to run all the way home. They did – the deaf team
won; the shocked hearing team lost.

How did it happen? Possibly the hearing outfielders did not communicate
that well between each other, allowing the ball to drop between them!

Jim Macfadden said that even though he made the game winning hit, he was not
proud of it, as it was a pop fly fluke single.

…………………………………………..

superintendent interpreting football game on TV

part of newspaper story

Ward grew up in south Knoxville, where his father, Herschel Ward, was
superintendent of Tennessee School for the Deaf. Ward’s mother, Sarah, was
a teacher at the school. In a documentary titled “The Voice,” which
chronicles Ward’s career, Ward said his father listened to Tennessee
football games on the radio when John was young.

For deaf students, Herschel Ward would draw scenes from the game on a
chart for them to interpret, while others read his lips.

note:
DeafDigest editor mentioned John Ward, growing up in a deaf
environment before becoming famous as a University of
Tennessee football announcer, but never mentioning Tennessee
School for the Deaf in any of his broadcasts or newspaper
stories!

………………………………………

Soccer ball manufacturer

part of newspaper story, as edited

Africa’s only ball mak, located in Zambia, has 150 employees.

40 percent of these employees are deaf!

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comment by Hope Solo, former goalie, USA women’s soccer team

We have a claim with the United States Olympic Committee under the Ted
Stevens Act, which means that a national governing body, a non-profit
organization like U.S. Soccer, has to put money back into the youth
system, has to put money back into the amateur system, the Paralympians,
the U.S. Deaf Team, they have to support all of soccer in the United
States,” Solo says. “Yet, they only support professional soccer because
that’s what makes them more money. Right now, it’s become profit or
progress and that’s why we filed a claim with the United States Olympic
Committee.”
 

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