2019/06/11

DeafDigest Sports – June 9-11, 2019

barry@deafdigest.com
for options, click on the above deafnews tab

Hot DeafSports News at:
http://deafdigestsports.com/

— random deafsports thoughts

— 2019 football schedules needed; so far 17 schedules turned in

— book on Gallaudet men’s basketball history

— golfers in hall of fame

— Texas girls’ basketball honored

— Illinois football legend

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2019 football schedules, 17 turned in so far

Just hoping all schedules will be turned in
before schools close for the summer.

If you have completed your football schedule, please
email it to barry@deafdigest.com

DeafDigest Sports wants to post deaf vs deaf
games for your benefit but cannot until all
schedules are turned in

thank you for understanding

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Gallaudet men’s basketball history book

If you have played basketball at Gallaudet and
have funny stories, funny tales and funny
anecdotes to share, please email:

barry@deafdigest.com

The book is slated for release during the Feb. 14-15, 2020
weekend.

This is a book of tales plus past scores and past won/lost
records – and not just only scores and won/lost records.

And, yes, many pictures in the book.

Thank you.

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Illinois football legend

part of newspaper story

50 years on, Poncar still an ISD athletics legend

Robert “Bob” Poncar was a halfback, fullback and linebacker on the
Illinois School for the Deaf’s football team in the late 1950s and early
’60s.

It was the late 1950s and early 1960s, and one of the best — if not the
best — prep football players in Illinois was playing in central Illinois.

More than 50 years later, Illinois School for the Deaf graduate Robert
“Bob” Poncar’s name still comes up — especially around football season —
as a name to remember for the records he broke and the talent he
displayed.

Poncar was widely considered the best prep football player playing during
his time. He wore the numbers 32 and 43 for the ISD Tigers, playing
halfback, fullback and linebacker on defense. He also averaged 17.6-plus
yards per carry, a rare rate at any level. In 1961, he had 23 touchdowns,
running for 1,470 total yards.

He was a machine, an undeniable talent.

His speed, agility and logical thinking helped Poncar excel not only in
football but in basketball, in which he averaged 18 points per game;
baseball and track.

While he was most commonly known as a fullback, Poncar also kicked for 18
extra points. As a senior, he was voted All-State and named a High School
All-American, both in football. He was eligible to play in the high school
all-star game in Oklahoma City that May but sat out with a knee injury.

He was recruited to play at Southern Illinois University, University of
Wisconsin, Texas University and Notre Dame but knee injuries also
prevented him from playing at the college level.

note:
Poncar was the talk of the Gallaudet athletic crowd, all hoping
he would enroll at Gallaudet. It was not to be.

He liked to run over people, not around people and that was
he was pretty much banged up despite getting his yardage
on the ground.

Recalls Herb Mapes, Poncar’s teammate, who played four seasons on
the offensive line at Gallaudet – it was always a first down each
time he carried the ball.

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Texas girls’ basketball honored

part of newspaper story

Achievements honored at inaugural Best of All-Centex Preps awards

The Inspiration Award went to the girls basketball team from the Texas
School for the Deaf, which advanced to the TAPPS Class 4A Final Four after
an undefeated regular season. Coached by Brian Sepak and led by seniors
Janelle Coons, Leila Sicola and Sunita Schmidjord, TSD set a national
record among deaf schools with 33 wins and dominated a schedule mostly
made up of hearing-able teams.

note:
Coach’s last name is Sipek, not Sepak.

TSD set a national record among deaf schools with 33 wins?
Don’t know. DeafDigest Sports editor has not researched it.

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from DeafDigest, remembering the past

DeafDigest dedicates this edition to Stan Benowitz
who departed us last week. He was a long time teacher
at several schools for the deaf and his influence on
students was profound.
It is not generally known that he is the Father
of Modern Gallaudet football; it is a long story, but
to make it short, he crafted a funding proposal during
his Gallaudet student days in 1947 that made possible
the restarting of football as a varsity sport on the
campus. Simply put, no Benowitz, no restarting of
Gallaudet football in 1947.

DeafDigest also dedicates this edition to Bob
Dillman, who departed us this week.
As a much younger man, Bob was the Gallaudet
quarterback, no big deal, except that he made
a successful transition from 6-man quarterback
to 11-man quarterback. 6-man quarterbacks cannot
hand off the ball; they must pitch out the ball,
and so his transition to 11-man football was
successful. He was from South Dakota School for
the Deaf.

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part of newspaper story – West Virginia high school football
all star game

GAME CLINCHER NULLIFIED: The South was able to make it close thanks to a
suspect block-in-the-back penalty on Petersburg’s Jacob Hartman’s 37-yard
touchdown return of an interception with 5:40 to play. Had it stood, the
North would have had a two touchdown lead with little time remaining.

“A lot of people don’t realize that Jacob is deaf,” Harman said. “I will
tell you this, there is no one tougher out on the field than that guy.

note:
Jacob Hartman, who played QB and linebacker at Petersburg HS is bound for
Glenville State University, a NCAA-II program. Even though he has the arm
as the quaterback, he probably will play linebacker. He chose Glenville
for one reason – his older brother (hearing) is on the team.

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Golfers in hall of fame

press release

USDGA HALL OF FAME news release

TIM DAPP AND PATTY LOPEZ SELECTED TO
UNITED STATES DEAF GOLF ASSOCIATION HALL OF FAME

The United States Deaf Golf Association Hall of Fame Committee announces
two new Hall of Fame inductees, Timothy Dapp of The Villages, FL as a
leader and Patricia
Lopez of Scottsdale, AZ as a player.   Tim and Patty will be honored at
the USDGA Hall of Fame ceremony during the United States Deaf Golf
Championship event to be
held at Lyman Orchards Golf Club in Middlefield, Connecticut this July 12,
2019.

Tim was a Williamsport, PA native before living in Crofton, Maryland for
many years.  He was involved with the Maryland Deaf Golf Association
(MDDGA) for over 25
years, serving as its president for over ten years.  He served the
Southeast Deaf Golf Association as President and Vice President from 2005
– 2016.  He was elected
and served as the United States Deaf Golf Association Vice President and
Team Director from 2009 to present.  As team director, he was able to lead
the United
States teams to several wins in World Deaf Golf Championship tournaments.
He also directed a youth golf camp in Maryland in 2015.  His leadership
has been
recognized by his excellent coaching and playing in USDGA events.  He won
USDGA’s Senior Championship four times and led the Men’s team to the World
Deaf Golf
Championship (WDGC) in 2008.  He continued to lead the Senior team winning
in 2014 and 2018.  Recently he placed third in the WDGC Senior Individuals
in Maynooth,
Ireland last July 2018.  Tim Dapp has attended many golf tournaments and
has been recognized and honored by their respective golf organizations.
He and his wife,
Julie moved to live in The Villages in 2018.

Patricia “Patty” Lopez grew up in Visalia, California.  When she was 15
years old, she tagged along with her father, playing golf and eventually
joined a men’s golf
team in junior college.  At California State University in Northridge she
was on the Women’s Golf team and qualified for individual competition at
the Association
for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) for two years.  She helped
her CSUN team win Southern California Athletic Association and Western
Collegiate
Athletics Association (SCAA-WCAA) twice in 1977 through 1980.  She
participated in several amateur tournaments winning sectional qualifying
to enter stroke play and
match play.  She won Farwest Deaf Golf Association (FWDGA) tournament in
1979 and placed third at FWDGA tournament in 1981.  She competed in USDGA
tournaments in
1982 & 1984.  When she joined the Players West Tour as a professional, she
won five times in 1983 through 1993, including back to back wins in 1989 &
1990.  She was
selected as one of the top 10 players to play in Japan for two weeks.
She was an LPGA Teaching Professional from 1993 to 2006.  After retiring
from professional
golf, she returned to amateur competition winning USDGC competition three
times in 2013, 2015 & 2017.  She competed in and won the World Deaf Golf
Championship in
2014 and was one of the top 5 golfers in 2016 & 2018 WDGC competitions.
She moved to Scottsdale, AZ in 2017.

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random deafsports thoughts

See above story on golf.

One of the caddies that served Patty Lopez on her rounds
was the late Gil Lentz. Patty praised Lentz as the best
caddie she has ever had.

Lentz pushed hard to promote Deaf Golf in Northern
California. He was a pretty much good golfer in his
own right.

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Gallaudet Athletics online store

http://GallaudetAthleticsStore.com