2019/05/31

DeafDigest Sports – May 31, 2019

barry@deafdigest.com
for options, click on the above deafnews tab

Hot DeafSports News at:
http://deafdigestsports.com/

— random deafsports thoughts

— 2019 football schedules needed; so far 14 schedules turned in

— Gallaudet baseball equally honored with other colleges

— USA Triathlon honors a deaf participant

— controversial goalie mentions the deaf

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2019 football schedules, 14 turned in so far

the 14th schedule was turned in yesterday

Just hoping all schedules will be turned in
before schools close for the summer.

If you have completed your football schedule, please
email it to barry@deafdigest.com

thank you

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Gallaudet baseball

part of newspaper story

All-South Region accolades

Teams represented on the All-South Region first, second and third teams
are Methodist, Christopher Newport, Ferrum, Shenandoah, Piedmont, York
(Pa.), Birmingham-Southern, Centre, LaGrange, Hendrix, Randolph-Macon,
Frostburg State, Huntigdon, North Carolina Wesleyan, Eastern Mennonite,
Berry, Salisbury, Rhodes, Virginia Wesleyan, Hampden-Sydney, Oglethorpe,
Sewanee, Gallaudet, Greensboro, Lynchburg and Roanoke.

note:
the Gallaudet respresentative is Cameron Upton; and as a matter of
a geographical quirk, Gallaudet basically plays against teams from
the north and not against teams listed above. Who cares! An All-South
honor is still a great honor.

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women’s soccer

as written by Hope Solo in her web site; she is a former USA women’s goalie

Eighteen months ago, I filed a complaint against U.S. Soccer with the
USOC. The reason was simple: U. S. Soccer was breaking federal law under
the Ted Stevens Act. It was failing to live up to its responsibilities as
the sport’s national governing body – not just for the Women’s National
Team and our fight for equality, but for families across the country who
can’t afford for their kids to play, the underserved communities who don’t
have the same opportunities, the unsupported Paralympic and deaf athletes,
and everyone else in between.

What did the USOC do? Nothing. They dismissed it. They told me I needed to
file a complaint with the very organization I was making a complaint
against, one that has time and time again, refused to do right by its
athletes. Worse, U.S. Soccer’s process for dealing with complaints looks
like this: athlete files complaint, U.S. Soccer hand picks a single
arbitrator to hear the complaint. It doesn’t take much to see the athlete
has little chance of succeeding. Not only is the process a joke, it’s
against the law.

The Stevens Act requires that all decision-making bodies, including
Grievance panels, have 20% athlete representation. U.S. Soccer, in a
blatant violation of Federal law, quietly changed its bylaws about 10
years ago to bypass the 20% athlete representation requirement. I am also
certain that 99% of our USSF athletes are not aware this right was
stripped of them years ago.

The USOC’s decision to dismiss the complaint made no sense. The USOC is
duty bound to protect the rights of athletes and in this case, they looked
the other way. I responded by filing a demand for arbitration with the
American Arbitration Association. (A full copy of the filing can be found
here.) I asked the AAA panel to determine that the USOC made a mistake —
that they had a responsibility to hear my complaint and evaluate the
merits of the issues. The panel’s ruling now forces the USOC to do that.
This is a massive first step in holding U.S. Soccer accountable and
protecting athletes’ rights.

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USA Triathlon Announces Multisport Award Winners

part of press release

Most Inspirational Comeback Award: Jennifer Stack (Frederick, Md.)

Jennifer Stack is the recipient of the Most Inspirational Comeback Award,
which recognizes athletes who have made a comeback to the sport after a
traumatic or troublesome situation. Stack was in a motor vehicle accident
in August of 2017 that caused a severe concussion. The resulting physical
and mental trauma left her unable to work, drive and live her prior active
lifestyle as an avid cyclist and swimmer. To compound the situation, Stack
has been completely deaf since age 2 and grew up in foster care following
the death of her mother.

Through intensive physical therapy at the University of Maryland
Rehabilitation and Orthopedic Institute, and dedicated work with her
neurologist and neuropsychologist, Stack steadily regained her endurance
for everyday activities in preparation for her return to sport. She
finished her last physical therapy session on April 30, 2018, and
completed the Westfields Sprint Aquabike in Chantilly, Virginia, on May 6.
She went on to complete several more races in 2018, culminating with a
second-place finish in the women’s 35-39 age group at the USA Triathlon
International-Distance Aquabike National Championships in Miami.

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random deafsports thoughts

Do read Hope Solo’s posting. She is correct when she said
in part –

the underserved communities who don’t have the same opportunities,
the unsupported Paralympic and deaf athletes, and everyone else
in between.

note:

The Stevens Act was supposed to help the deaf with funding for
international competition. It mostly hasn’t.

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Gallaudet Athletics online store

http://GallaudetAthleticsStore.com

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